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Tree and mulch planted in rain-planting basin. Julie holds free mulch collected from along the street curb.

Tree and mulch planted in rain-planting basin. Julie holds free mulch collected from along the street curb.

Yesterday riding my bike home across Tucson I saw a bare wet spot. A prime planting spot. A potential-life spot. A food spot. A joy spot.

Such a spot can be artificial, the result of imported water, as it was in this case. But even better if it’s natural—due to a natural concentration of precipitation or locally harvested rainwater—as this site soon started to become….

Many years ago an ornamental non-native tree had been planted here, with drip irrigation installed. In less than a year the drought-stressed tree blew over in a strong wind and died, but the irrigation continued to run.

I had planted a food-bearing native tree in its place, and in many other bare spots in the public rights-of-way. Almost all the native trees I planted thrived—thanks to their stronger root systems—but for some reason a landscaping crew took out the young Foothills palo verde tree in this one spot. This weekend it was time to try again.

Click here to read about our impromptu, unauthorized planting of a native, food-bearing shade tree in the public right-of-way—and perhaps get inspired to do the same to enhance a bit of your urban environment!

‘Drops In a Bucket’ Blog © 2015
www.HarvestingRainwater.com

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