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It wouldn’t be quite right to say that DigDeep is raising drought awareness. If you live in California, it’s impossible to be any more aware of just how little water we have left.

Image Credit: Alvaro Valiño

That’s why DigDeep is striving to show Californians how much they can do with what little water we have. On Saturday, the non-profit hosted its first-ever “Empty Pool Party” in downtown Los Angeles.

How Did DigDeep Save Water With a Free Party?

DigDeep provided Planet Experts with a gallon-by-gallon list of savings generated by the event. Staged in an empty pool (natch), the party was attended by over 450 locals and celebrities who “paid” for the fun by pledging to do one of several items on a water-saving menu, such as taking shorter showers. These pledges added up to 44,746 gallons.

Empty Pool Party hosted by DIGDEEP at Downey Pool on September 26, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Alison Buck/Getty Images for DIGDEEP)

Empty Pool Party hosted by DIGDEEP at Downey Pool on September 26, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Alison Buck/Getty Images for DIGDEEP)

Food for the party was comprised of vegan and water-friendly options (including drought-resistant produce) from Whole Foods and Cabo Chips. When you consider the two ounces of beef that would have gone into each of the 450 tacos provided, and the 1,847 gallons of water it would have taken to produce that 56.25 pounds of meat, you end up with 103,432 gallons of savings.

Water from the drained pool was collected prior to the event, purified, and turned into vodka. The 35 .75 liter bottles of recycled pool water add up to seven gallons of savings.

A poolgoer lounging atop some LA shade balls. (Photo by Alison Buck/Getty Images for DIGDEEP)

A poolgoer lounging atop some LA shade balls. (Photo by Alison Buck/Getty Images for DIGDEEP)

By choosing to stage the party in an empty pool – a seasonal venue that would otherwise sit unused for months after it’s been drained – 402,000 gallons of water (the normal volume of the full pool) was saved.

Six urinals were replaced with flushless toilets by Falcon Waterfree, saving 150 gallons, and approximately 100 people took the Change the Course Pledge to restore 1,000 gallons of water to the Colorado River, saving an additional 100,000 gallons.

That makes a total savings of 650,335 gallons!

The 4Liters Challenge: Your Turn to Get in on the Action

The average American uses more than 100 gallons of water per day. Compare that to people living in poverty, who often must get by on just four liters per day for the bare minimum of survival.

One of several plastic pools filled with drought-tolerant plants located around the #EmptyPoolParty. (Photo by Alison Buck/Getty Images for DIGDEEP)

One of several plastic pools filled with drought-tolerant plants located around the #EmptyPoolParty. (Photo by Alison Buck/Getty Images for DIGDEEP)

That’s why DigDeep is challenging YOU to take its 4Liters Challenge. Click on the link and sign up for the challenge, after which you’ll be asked to spend one 24-hour period using just four liters of water. That’s for everything – washing, cleaning, drinking, etc. When you’ve completed the challenge, you can share the experience online and challenge your friends and family to do so as well.

Each person that successfully completes the challenge will save at least 90 gallons of water per day.

“We want to change the way you think about water,” says George McGraw, founder of DigDeep. “We believe that if we can help everyday Americans fall in love with their water — learn to appreciate, respect and conserve it — not only will our community be more sustainable, but we’ll be able to connect to other communities without water as their equals, not just their donors.”

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